Is your child hyperactive or inattentive or both?

We seldom think of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, often simply called ‘hyperactivity’, as a condition that requires to be clinically treated.  But the fact is that 3 to 7 per cent of the child population has ADHD  And, though 15 to 50 per cent of children with ADHD outgrow the disorder in due course, the effect of non-treatment could have serious consequences. 

Restlessness, impulsive behaviour, impatience and/ or absent-mindedness are the primary characteristics of children who have the disorder.  But, all children, and indeed all of us, are likely to exhibit these tendencies at times.  The difference is that in children with ADHD, these symptoms are the rule and not the exception.  A psychologist needs to be approached for a proper diagnosis.

Clicking on the following link will lead you to a site maintained by the students of Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Massacuhusetts, USA.  Besides the experiences of a couple of students, there is a lot more information on ADHD and how to cope with it. http://www.wpi.edu/Admin/Disabilities/experiences.html

Dr. Russell A Barkley, an internationally acclaimed expert, who has received numerous awards for a lifetime of research in ADHD has his  official site at http://www.russellbarkley.org/adhd-facts.htm and

A wonderful resource parents with children suffering from the disorder is to be found at http://www.helpguide.org/mental/adhd_add_parenting_strategies.htm.  In simple, elegant prose, the site gives helpful ideas for application in real life situations. 

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3 thoughts on “Is your child hyperactive or inattentive or both?

  1. [The comment below is from Jane Hersey, Director of Feingold Association. DEEP]

    You may want to check out the recent Lancet study on ADHD from the University of Southampton in England. The researchers found that a modest dose of food dyes and one preservative brought on ADHD symptoms in children, both with and without any history of ADHD.

  2. Pingback: An E-magazine for Ordinary People « DEEP - The CyberSpace Meeting Place for People with Disabilities

  3. Pingback: DEEP - An E-magazine for Ordinary People « DEEP - The CyberSpace Meeting Place for People with Disabilities

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